Myoryu-ji Temple
Myoryu-ji Temple
Myoryu-ji Temple
Myoryu-ji Temple
Myoryu-ji Temple Myoryu-ji Temple Myoryu-ji Temple Myoryu-ji Temple

May Noon

Mroryu-ji is a temple of Nichiren sect of Buddhism and was relocated to its current location from a site near Kanazawa Castle in 1643 by Maeda Toshitsune, the third lord of the Kaga clan. The temple functions as a fort and has been equipped with many trick mechanisms. Among them are warrior's hiding places, hidden stairways, donation boxes and stairways with pitfalls, and wells with secret tunnels. Because of that, it is known as the Ninja Temple. All these tricks were secretly created by Toshitsune, a clever man who decided to play the fool, to get the shogunate off his back. At that time, the shogunate forbade construction of buildings higher than three stories. The main hall may look like a two-story building, but it is actually a four-story building with seven layers, which includes a middle floor and a middle-middle floor, and a total of 23 rooms and 29 stairways. Soldiers keep a lookout for enemies from the watchtower in the roof of the main hall.

  • Address

    1-2-12 Nomachi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa

    Local map

  • Entry fee

    Only a limited number of elementary and junior school children allowed.
    Pre-school aged children are not allowed to enter.

  • Opening Hours

    9:00 - 16:30
    November to February: 9:00 - 16:00

  • Closed

    -

  • Website

    http://www.myouryuji.or.jp/en.html

  • Best Season

    All year

  • Point

    A temple converted into a fort with many trick mechanisms behind the government's back.

  • Nearest Station/IC Access

    15 minutes by bus from JR Kanazawa Station to Hirokoji. It is a 3-minute walk from there.

    30 minutes from Kanazawa-Nishi IC on Hokuriku Expressway.

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